Although a recent study suggests that women with normal results on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans at ages 67 and older may wait up to 15 years for a second test, a Viewpoint article published recently in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (JBMR) cautions that such a lengthy interval is inappropriate for many adults. Viewpoints allow experts to provide a new perspective on research. In their article osteoporosis experts Lewiecki M et al write that monitoring bone mineral density by DXA should be done at intervals much shorter than 15 years for many individuals. These include younger postmenopausal women at high risk for fracture, patients whose DXA scans indicate bone mineral density values substantially below normal, those with prior fracture or clinical risk factors for fracture, and patients already receiving osteoporosis drug therapy. Many women, even those at risk for osteoporosis, never receive an initial DXA screening with the result that osteoporosis often goes undiagnosed and untreated leading to debilitating fractures that are dangerous to patients and costly to treat.