The Royal Osteoporosis Society (ROS) has launched a Research Roadmap to develop better treatment methods and work towards a cure for osteoporosis. 

The roadmap will be formally published in January 2021, and outlines how a future with osteoporosis can be reached through:

  • understanding the condition’s causes
  • developing new technologies and enhancing therapeutic interventions to optimise bone health across the whole of life
  • and ensuring that every person at high risk of breaking a bone is identified, assessed and treated appropriately.

Developed by the Osteoporosis and Bone Research Academy, the report undertakes reviews of key evidence to identify gaps in osteoporosis research and clinical care of patients. The ambition being a world in which osteoporotic fractures become a rare occurrence, rather than events which affect the lives of one in two older women and one in five older men.

Support over 3.5 million people living with osteoporosis

The Roadmap sets out how strategically targeted research will fill these knowledge gaps. The ultimate aim, a world without osteoporosis, will be achieved through understanding causes, developing new technologies and enhancing therapeutic interventions to optimise bone health across the whole of life, and to ensure that every person who is at high risk of fracture is identified, assessed and treated appropriately.

Chief Executive of the Royal Osteoporosis Society Craig Jones said: “This new Research Roadmap is a milestone in our work to facilitate more effective treatments and to move towards a cure. We’re determined not only to support the 3.5 million people living with osteoporosis in the present day, but also to lead a step change in research for future patients.”

The Roadmap demonstrates two contrasting bone health trajectories across life: one likely to end with fracture, and one resulting in healthy skeletal ageing. Along this lifecourse journey, the Academy researchers have identified key gaps in the evidence and care base - and developed cutting edge scientific approaches to tackling these.

Substantial funding will be sought to deliver this ambitious work, which has the potential to achieve a step change in the bone health of the population and in the care of patients with osteoporosis. Importantly, the Academy will also incorporate comprehensive input from scientists, clinicians and Patient Advocates.